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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
first election. he's my date this weekend. >> very nice. i'll see you at the balls. thanks again, star. appreciate it. so kate, got everybody out here. we've got personalities, advocates, politicians, you fame it. folks are coming out, signing up to volunteer, participate, and a lot of folks are attracting them to the tent. >> absolutely. a lot going on the mall today. thank you, suzanne. we'll continue to track all of the events taking place this inauguration weekend but we want to get caught up on other stories making headlines today. john? >> we'll start overseas now. algeria, seven hostages and 11 kidnappers are reported dead today. algerian superb forces had been trying to secure the release of an unknown number of people including americans being held at this gas plant by an al qaeda-linked terror group. lance armstrong admits he cheated and admits he deserved to be punished. the disgraced cyclist told oprah winfrey he does feel remorse for what he did and says cheating cost him sponsorships word about $75 million. he could lose a lot more as sponsors and supporters sue to get so
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
was popular in the re-election, he was in a difficult fiscal cliff negotiation where he got the tax increases he wanted. the democrats arenited but he faces such quick battles particularly over the debt and over gun legislation that he'd like to pursue, there isn't much of a reset, not much of a honeymoon because there's a carryover of toxic atmosphere in washington when it comes to getting big things done. >> you covered the white house about two terms of the bush administration. what does the president, what is the hard reality of his second term in. >> well he builds up a lot of political capital with re-election and that's very freeing for a second term president but the calendar is short. you have a limited amount of time to really drive the agenda and the president would like to get big things done from immigration to energy, but he's going to be facing trench warfare with republicans over the budget, for some time to come. i think that's going to overshadow most of what he does. >> david gregory thanks very much. >>> when "nbc nightly news" continues on this saturday, new research abou
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host: my enemy's enemy is my friend. you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: well, for me looking back it wasn't that difficult a choice because i knew i wasn't going to go into the military. >> host:
of time to practice. the election ended, then the presidential inaugural commission stepped in. and we don't know who was going to win on election night. so they had very little time, just over two months, to get this ready. >> one of wolf's favorite thing, another float. this is the delaware state float. >> the home state of the vice president. >> it's a replica of the state capitol bell tower. >> wilmington. capitol is dover, delaware, right? >> correct. >> yes, i knew that. there they are. >> you know these floats, they were making these floats around the clock over the course of 19 days to get them ready. >> all custom made. >> from delaware, university of maryland marching band, college park, maryld, the terps of maryland, playing for the president. ♪ john king is watching this as well. every one of these bands, these floats, they all have a significance for this president and the vice president. >> you've mentioned the home states, the birth states. now we're moving on to the neighborhood, as you might say, washington, d.c. i think part of what you're seeing, a band from ohio as we
't happening this time, but is there a reset here? >> the president was popular in the re-election. he wanted tax increases for the wealthy, he got those. his party is united but he faces a very difficult environment in washington and immediately after this inauguration, he is back in the brew of a fight over the debt and the fight over the gun legislation that he wants so it's a pretty toxic atmosphere here. >> you covered both terms of the second bush -- of the bush administration. what is the hard reality of a second term for a president? >> time moves quickly. you feel good. you put in the people you want. you have a different attitude of what you can accomplish. you don't have to run. you don't have to campaign anymore, and realize the window is short. the president's got big goals whether it's energy, immigration and he's in the trench warfare yet with republicans with a series of big stand 1y5u6s coming up, starting with the debt ceiling. all of this about the budget which could quickly overtake the second term. >> david gregory, thanks very much. i want to let folks know, tomorrow mor
changes be made? >> i actually don't think so. when you look at the democrats up for re-election in the senate, many are from southern states, pro-gun states. there's very little common ground when you're dealing with the right in the constitution. >> this is the problem here when you put politics in it, you have too many people worried about getting re-elected as opposed to worrying about the 10,000-plus folks killed every year when it comes to gun violence. they should put lives ahead of their jobs. >> let me share another quote. "time" magazine/orc poll shows that 56% support a ban on semiautomatic weapons. that is down from 62% in december. if a poll was taken right now, what do you think -- what do you think that would be? >> oh, you know, i would be very interested to see it because of how you shape it. it's fascinating. we did a thing from our radio show, talking to people and showing pictures. they said, yeah, ban that gun. it was a shotgun, it just had a pistol grip. people didn't understand. the problem with the assault weapons ban has always been it's a spooky looking
obama was elected -- poverty numbers continue to get worse. on barack obama -- put the facts on the table. they kept getting worse under barack obama -- sachs writes about this. demonize,ing this to but i'm wondering how is your mind that poverty gets made a priority, whether the president is a republican or a democrat? >> i think i did say that when we went into the ditch as bush came out of office, poverty continue to increase. there is no question about that. it has increased significantly. i do not believe that as a nation, not just the white house but the bottom up, any of us have done enough to address the issues of poverty in this country. we talk about dr. king. one of the things he said was there comes a time when silence is betrayal. [applause] any president is going to address issues we may can address. whoever the president is -- republican or democrat, no matter what. i can say in all fairness that even though i do not believe any of us have done enough, if you look at the two major pieces of legislation that were passed by this white house, obamacare, which ever
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
personal exhaustion. i think at the moment coming off of the election coming off of the inauguration you will see a lot of energy in the white house for the next few months it becomes sort of a drive towards the last minute lame-duck no one in congress at least is paying a lot of attention to any more. by the end of the second term his hair is going to look like marks' probably. his hair was all black when he took office in its nearly all gray now. still ahead an all-star evening who is showing up tonight including the big one hosted by rahm emanuel. a solid gold treatment for cancer how the metal that makes up your favorite jewelry could save your life. hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to talk to people like you. you always do what they tell you? no... try it, and see what your good driving can save you. you don't even have to switch. unless you're scared. i'm not scared, it's... you know we can still see you. no, you can't. pretty sure we can... try snapshot today -- no pressure. can pluggable febre
to die in the american desert. the suffering must end. we look forward to working with our elected officials and all of good will toward this end. granted. -- thank you. >> as you can see by this range of perspective, the differences are not great but the unity is clear. the congress must take advantage of the opportunity to pass broad immigration reform. i would like to take questions from the press. please introduce yourself, your name as well as your outlook. >> i would like to hear more about the republican super pac. jeb bush, would they be a part of that? >> at this point -- the, we are getting all the paperwork and -- together and we should be ready to go soon. obviously the role of the super pac is to raise money that we can use to support immigration in districts where a republican is supportive. we cannot give the money to a candid it or say vote for this man or this woman. but we can support the concept in those critical districts. you will have to ask governor bush what his plans are and what he is doing. i would assume that anything related to immigration will catch hi
. the latino vote but it was decisive in the last election. when, each of these groups that played a role, that's why in my view when i came here for the inauguration i said the day before the inauguration i give a speech and i said the important day is not tomorrow. we celebrate that. the important days the day after tomorrow. what are we going to do then and for a lot of people they went home and celebrated. >> host: it is a milestone. i never thought i would see a black president. so it is to be we've talked a great deal about the movement and very little about you but i think we are getting to know you're here in your comments. you ended dr. king's papers. there are several peepers in boston university. how are the papers that you edited -- >> guest: they're all very different. the papers line editing, the papers at boston, the papers in atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found papers in india. we bring them all together and decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host:
's progress. >> reporter: and now, the man who ran the president's re-election campaign is hoping to reform it into a grassroots army to support the president's agenda for a second term. >> we have hundreds of thousands of neighborhood team members and leaders in every state of the union. we're going to work across party lines to get some things done. >> reporter: four years ago, the president promised to rise above partisan politics. >> on this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and wornout dogmas that strangle our policies. >> reporter: it was a promise unfulfilled, as washington became more divided. this time around, he's going to try to directly appeal to some of those who voted against him. and, george, the white house plans a quick start. the president's team has been studying the experiences of other second-term presidents. and they have seen that you really only have about 18 months before a second-term president starts to look like a lame duck. they plan to hit the ground running. look for him to be traveling the country,
presidential inauguration. don't expect any election gloating or policy. the white house says president obama's address is designed to strike a hopeful tone. advisors say the speech will build upon the one election night. reminding our country our founding principles can still guide us in a changing world. we welcome you back now to our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy overlooking pennsylvania avenue. behind us, you will be able to see the capitol building in just a little bit. we had to move because of the sunrise. but we will have a great view of the ceremonies and parade. right now we want to show you the parade route and talk a little about that. the parade is set to begin around 2:40 this afternoon when president obama, the first lady, vice president biden and dr. jill biden lead that parade. there are a few local groups marching in the parade this year. they are the mighty sound of maryland marching band from the university of maryland. the 54th massachusetts volunteer company b headquartered in silver spring and the marching nights from dc's blue high school. righ
should be done. but you have probably more than any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you have done a great deal of work on this. all of you who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but if i did, a lot of people would put their hands up in this room. how many of you mayors attended the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city? many of you, many of you have had to attend and many of you, many, many funerals. some of your communities experienced mass shootings, not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and not unique to big cities. it was -- i happened to be literally, probably turned out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the woods that we didn't know where we thought there were hunters. i got back to the clubhouse in this outing and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish school just outside of lancaster, pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities or well-to-do su
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)